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Facial Recognition to replace Passports Veification Process in Australian Airports

The Department of Immigration of Australia and Border Protection has sought technology that would abolish incoming passenger cards, remove the need for most passengers to show their passports and replace manned desks with electronic stations and automatic triage. This Electronic technology is the first ever in the world.

This “contactless” system for arrivals this year, reported by Fairfax reported on Sunday – the technological and most ambitious stage of the Seamless Traveller initiative was announced in 2015.This passport technology will bring a new era geared is towards making travellers heading to Australia have a new travelling experience. Incoming paper passenger cards would be abolished and manned stations would be replaced by electronic stations and automatic triage.

In this system, travellers at the various Australian airports will get their documents being processed at a very quick rate as compared to the traditional desk system. Passengers would not need to show their passports, instead being processed by biometric recognition of their faces, irises and/or fingerprints.

Under the new system, the existing SmartGates that scan passports electronically – introduced less than 10 years ago – would be an outcast. A spokeswoman for the automated processing technology said that “automated processing technology provided a simpler process for travellers and enabled the Australian Border Force to meet the challenges of increasing traveller numbers “while maintaining the security of our border”.

“Our ability to harness the power of big data is increasing exponentially,” John Coyne, head of border security at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, told The Sydney Morning Herald. That may be true, but it doesn’t mean that the Department of Immigration and Border Protection has even figured out what technology it will be using. “The department is asking tenderers to provide innovative solutions to allow arriving travellers to self-process,” a spokeswoman for immigration said. So, this is all contingent on the private sector coming forward and making it happen.

John Coyne told Fairfax “Our ability to harness the power of big data is increasing exponentially,” The Australian government aims to have 90% of travellers processed automatically, with no human involvement at all, by 2019-20. But how that will be executed remains to be seen.

“The department is asking tenderers to provide innovative solutions to allow arriving travellers to self-process,” a spokeswoman for immigration said in a statement. “The department has not therefore defined the specific solution or how it will differ from existing arrivals or departures SmartGates.”

The Seamless Traveller system was budgeted to spend $94 million over five years to make the airport process more efficient. For about 10 years, automatic passport scanning stations have been used the 40 million travellers to the land down under. Those stations will be retired under the new system. Reportedly, officials hope to launch a pilot program at Canberra airport in July.

While biometric technology has experienced huge leaps of progress, it’s still imperfect and controversial. It also raises ethical concerns with privacy advocates and current iterations have shown racial bias. An entire country relying on biometrics for its immigration system would certainly be an early-adopter shot in the arm for the industry. That will come with consequences as the tech becomes cheaper, more ubiquitous and widespread in other sectors. We’ll have to make it through four more years before we find out what those consequences might be.

“Our ability to harness the power of big data is increasing exponentially,” John Coyne, head of border security at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, told The Sydney Morning Herald. That may be true, but it doesn’t mean that the Department of Immigration and Border Protection has even figured out what technology it will be using. “The department is asking tenderers to provide innovative solutions to allow arriving travellers to self-process,” a spokeswoman for immigration said. So, this is all contingent on the private sector coming forward and making it happen.

40-million air and sea travellers were processed by the Australian Border Force in the 2015-16 year. In May, Michael Pezzullo, the secretary of the department, told the CIVSEC Border 21 conference in Melbourne that improved technology permitted those systems to be reimagined.

“In our future operating model, we will seek to build ever less intrusive, more seamless and faster processing processes and systems for the legitimate and law-abiding majority of travellers and traders,” Pezzullo said.

Now the era have come for facial recognition to take down the manual system of travelling experience, but my question is, do this technological evolution poses threat to the desk system workers?

 

 Credit:{Guardian}

About the author

Anane Ebenezer

I am 23 years from Ghana (West Africa).My core aim for developing TechGenez is to “Connect People All Over The World to the World of Technology”. That is my mission on planet earth.God Bless You for passing by.

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